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Skodsborg, Denmark:
February 2000

The purpose of the Skodsborg meeting was to coordinate national efforts. Of major concern was the need for international input to the design of the Canada Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS).

Key points included:

bulletMeetings planned with country Native advisory and management groups: Greenland Greenland Advisory Board and Research Group– late March;; Canada – teleconference in early March; meeting in April. The Kola Peninsula team has already met with its Saami Advisory Committee. Norway is appointing members to its Advisory Board, including the former president of the Saami Parliament, (name?). Sweden hopes to have its first Advisory Board meeting this spring.

 

bulletFollow-up meeting of country coordinators: Ottawa April 2-3. Plan to also meet with Stat Can APS staff at that time.

 

bulletProject presentations at International Conference of Circumpolar Health in Norway; at the Inuit Studies Conference at Aberdeen Scotland in August, Conference of International Statisticians. Statistics Greenland is organizing a Conference on Living Conditions in the Arctic for September 2000.

 

bulletStatistics Canada is collaborating with SLiCA in its Aboriginal People’s Survey. Ned Searles represents SLiCA and the Inuit Taparisat of Canada on the APS Implementation Committee. The Next Implementation Committee Meetings are: Feb. 24-25 and April 5-6.

 

bulletJens-Iver will take the lead in producing a book that introduces Arctic Living Conditions concepts that informing this study. Draft chapters will be due by November 2000 and the publication as a whole should be in draft by Feb. 2001.

 

bulletContent: SLiCA team members are prepared to help in the development of Canada’s APS with the understanding that this will also help in the development of SLiCA.

 

bulletContent: At the same time, SLiCA will focus on changes in family systems, work systems, spirituality, and political resources.

 

bulletContent: We recognize that we have a broad range of health conditions in the Arctic, but many common problems. We are also interested in the relationship between western and traditional health systems.

 

bulletWhile we can assume that there will be regionally-specific questions, our goal should be to develop the largest common core of questions possible.

 

bulletMaterials providing relevant content to SLiCA include: the 1994 Greenland Survey, the APS, the “Oslo List” developed by Jens-Iver and Thomas, the Maori study of identity, the Chukotka and Kola Peninsula questionnaires, the Alaska/Canada Topic List, and the Canada Regional Health Survey.

 

bulletWe each bring a unique combination of content and regional expertise to SLiCA. We have an obligation to make our content interests applicable to all regions. Likewise, we have an obligation to understand each other’s content interests and apply them to our region. The unique mix of expertise represented by project team members is a key strength of the study. See Skodsborg Working Assignments

  See Skodsborg Summary Report.

In preparation for the Skodsborg meeting, Ned Searles (Canada) and Jack Kruse (USA) prepared a comparison of items and concepts to be measured. See: Skodsborg Synthesis Document

One of the documents contributing to the Skodsborg Synthesis Document is a list of concepts developed by Thomas Anderson (Greenland) and Jens Ivar Negaard (Norway). See Oslo List.

Also in preparation for the Skodsborg meeting, Ned Searles and Jack Kruse prepared  household and personal synthesis questionnaires. See:

o     Household Questionnaire

o     Personal Questionnaire